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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 131 (some duplicates have been removed)
, gay-rights, and did briefly mention education. >> no single person can trade of the single math and science teachers read for the future. we must harness new ideas to revamp the tax code and reform our schools and empower citizens with the skills they need to work harder and reach higher. lou: he did not actually say education but he did mention the word reform. he wants to change everything. if you believe the data the federal education department puts out you may think there is no need it only reflected the reality. the education department is a giddy that shows high-school graduation rate is 78-point to%. 70-point to% that is a 35 year, and not a high but the best this report, think about it. 21% is not getting it done. the education department also notes, about this, the national dropout rate is 3 percent overall down from 4% last year. are you kidding me? if only 78.2% are getting it done how does that end up at 3%? new mask? federal math? political math. is a joke not funny brought to by the department of education. a report from a nonprofit group last year told the differ
challenge that harvard business school faces today? >> business education in america itself has become stagnant. all of the growth in business schools is in places like china and india and brazil and eastern europe. we're a great american business school in a great american century. people came to the united states because they thought that this was the center of management practice and management innovation. but now if you were to try and educate leaders who have to operate in the world in what i you this of as this new global century of business by teaching them just about american education, i think we would be irresponsible to our mission of educating leaders who make a difference in the world. >> in a nutshell the biggest challenge that you face is competition? >> yes. it seems surprising. you would think there isn't a competition for harvard business school, but people are coming up with different models. we have students, all 900 of our students in the first year are currently in january scattered all around the world, trying to understand globalization. they've all been asked t
with an election victory. >> did germany's education minister plagiarize her phd? her university launches an investigation. talk about putting a cap amongst the pigeons a day after german and french leaders pledged to deepen e u's economic and monetary union. the british prime minister has signaled his country could want out. >> in a very -- delayed speech, david cameron said he wants to renegotiate the terms of britain's membership and the referendum, but not until the end of 2017. >> that has rattled london's biggest allies and some investors. more uncertainty and possible of people are not what they have been wishing for. >> kamen said he'd campaigned for es you vote, saying he had won the decisions he had -- the concessions he had campaigned on. >> the move had long been anticipated at home and across the european union. david cameron laid out his vision of britain's future. it is one that involves major changes and giving the british public a say in what happens. >> when that referendum comes, let me say now that if we can negotiate such an arrangement, i will campaign for it with al
? >> the evidence is compelling, education, human capital, people can work with information and technology. and many people in american society today, cannot afford by themselves to get that kind of education. you can make resources available to support younger people and families that is good for them, that is good for the economy, and that is good for the tax base. it is going to strengthen the budget. >> in terms of competitiveness worldwide, building a stronger work force, as you mentioned, early childhood education to college education is vital to american competitiveness, suspect it? >> is the number one determining informant. how much do we produce in this economy? number one, looking forward is human capital, that is about education, the ability to innovate and work with the new technologies. >> over the short run, what is the effect of across the board cuts on pell grants on research funding--for medical research and scientific research? >> it is all going to be negative for growth and human capital. it is also going to give you negative impact on the budget. >> while the most immediate con
's program. so whether it's bridging and roads or medical research or education or a number of other things fall under the discretionary category including definite spending. i simply say, we have to come to the realization that unless we can address our mandatory spending, which is running away with the budget and ever shrinking's congress' ability about how we use discretionary spending. unless we can get control of that, everybody is going fall short of what they want. i'm not debating as more money should go to medical research or building infrastructure or whatever. i'm simply saying all is being squeezed and i'm asking you to support your senator or senators or representatives in giving them the backbone and the courage to stand up we have to address this or everybody loses. and i think that is the message of the day. and now we had an election over that issue. we're having a debate in congress every day over that issue. until this point, the president has not indicated post election that he's all that happy about addressing the mandatory spending issue. and we can't get there until h
. the president has made a commitment to education and he is running with a 52% approval rate, and this is a good start for a second term. >> what about the critics of the president to say that the deficit has grown and he has not put his weight behind climate change. in his first address, he mentioned climate change three times. and there are still problems in the country and the criticism -- is that he has given a fabulous speech but has not followed through. >> i think some of the criticism is fair but you have to also talk about his initial priorities or challenges. he is really committed to doing something about this in the second term. the deficit is one of the most difficult issues and the president -- he does not sign the appropriation bills until they are passed by congress. and this is not something that the president can do alone. it is the congress decides how big the deficit will be but the president has to work with congress. we need more revenue and we need to drive down spending. i think the president understands that and he is working on this but he cannot do this alone. >> looki
think that we're more educated on than those, we do know that public pension funds, teachers, all of barack obama's, you know, his starting outfield, they have money in the stock market and this will hurt the stock market. >> i hear you, but, guys, i've got to tell you, a lot of things that rich people have done and agreed to in the last few years that i think hurts them and hurts this country. thanks a lot. see this shrimp, i bet you thought he was a goner. and some lawmakers want to bring back the spending that brought back this critter. attention, all shoppers, your credit card bill is about to get bigger with a new fee kicking in this weekend. and people fee'd up are lashing out. you maniacs, you blew it up! >> charge it up and pay up. starting tomorrow, retailers no longer having to pay the processing fees to credit card companies. part after class action lawsuit rolling. so, who is going to cover the cost? how about you. it could add another 4% to every purchase that you make with plastic. this is a nightmare. >> more than a nightmare. let me tell you people love their cred
population here, they want educated workers to come. but for those who do, it's still back to school. these are spanish engineers with six hours a day of intensive german learning. and it's not just the young. >> you need a lot of time. a lot of effort. and then it's really difficult to learn german. >> difficult even when you can speak some. samuel is an i.t. specialist. he lost his job because of the spanish crisis. now he wakes each day at 4:00 to deliver germany its bread. this isn't the life he imagined. >> after three months if you have to job, you start to run out of money. this is the second step for me. >> there will be many more like him. europe and the unemployment is still rising and the educated jobless will travel wherever they can to build a future. matthew price, "bbc world news," germany. >> 40 years ago today the supreme court reached a landmark decision in the case of row versus wade. it gave women thal constitutional right to abortion but did not achieve consensus. so it's not hard to get an abortion since the court ruling. this report from mississippi. >> anna, h
. manufacturers have barbershops that supply them and local cafeter cafeterias. to educate communities around the world that this is vital for job growth because we have a jobs crisis today, ali, and manufacturing is the solution space for the jobs crisis. >> so, andrew liveris talking about job creation. the theme of dynamism has emerged over the course of the week here to jobs. >> i came here thinking they were absolutely stark-raving mad with resilient dynamism. now i'm starring to think it was a stroke of genius because it's allowed everybody to grab onto something and that developed into the theme jobs. >> well, listen, a few long working days here at davos. we've interviewed a lot of people, attended a lot of sessions. some of the best work is done just in the hallway having conversations with people. but this is a beautiful place and a pretty fun place to be. there are a lot of [ indiscernible ]s and parties and of course the skiing. richard, before we got started, hit the slopes. but being the true journalist that he is, you asked people how they were feeling about the economy. what d
. education, human capital, the ability to work with information technology. these are huge determinants. many people in american society today cannot afford by themselves to get the kind of education. to make resources available, support younger people, support families, institute, human capital, that is good for them, that's good for the economy and that's good for the tax base. over the medium term it will strengthen the projects. >> in terms of competitiveness, worldwide, building a stronger workforce from, as you mentioned, early childhood education to access to a college education is really vital to american competitiveness, isn't it? >> it's the number one determined that both our competitiveness, and our productivity, how much do we produce. number one determined, looking forward, human capital, education, that ability to innovate, ability to work with new technologists. >> over the short run, what is the effect of a cross the board cuts on early childhood education, on pell grants, on research funding for medical research and other basic scientific research? .. >> thank you, mr. chair
. it was in a book about teaching kids how to smoke weed, but an educational book about how they might talk to their kids about a difficult subject with him i don't run into. so that's where the format is an illustrated picture book for kids. as i got into the subject and started looking into train, which is relevant to some children's lives. their children but pickett, families involved in the oppressive policies to eradicate coca and it's a social or cultural issue. as i got deeper into the history of coca and specifically with relationships of the coca-cola company, origins from a medical marvel to the drug problem we have today, it got really complicated and so now it's a book for adults. i also started in coca with coffee because they wanted to do a comparison is not in that fascinated me with the way the drugs, plants change their perceptions over time for the cultural perceptions, the legal, social perceptions. as inspired by michael collins spoke about body of desire, where he talks about the history for different plants. when apples came to this country, they want the fleshy fruit
. there's personal-finance out of this over a period of years. our goal is to educate people for that great depression will never happen again. it's very much in the wake of its time. and i get that we can teach people certain skills. if they learn the skills we will all be okay. >> the dark side of the personal-finance industry with helaine olen saturday night at 10 on c-span2. look for more booktv online, like is on facebook. >> what's the best training for policeman? >> the best training you can get to become a really good police officer is to understand what it's all about. i will say that to the day i die. you learn to develop forces. you learn how to use intelligence information. you learn how to leverage relationships in a community at that is key. people in the 20 trust you, they will tell you when to our things that are happening that are not yet crimes. so that you can intervene. they will tell you all about how to go about doing it. i really learned the most of my career from those relationships. >> from high school dropout and single mother t to the youngest polic
to provide them with an opportunity to correct their behavior and move on so they can get education and get employment and they can become a productive member of society. and generally the juveniles, again, that we deal with are not any different than the adults we deal with. these are juveniles that often come from homes where supervision of the home is either not there or is very lacking. there's really a significant lack of role model support so there are a lot of problems already. the juveniles that generally come to our attention already bring with themselves. the problem is there's still not enough funding, there is not enough vehicles to provide the services that are necessary, so that is a challenge for us, and unfortunately, often the drug use, drug abuse and those other things do lead to serious crimes when they in fact do become involved in a different part of the process. the other question has to do with back and track. i don't see 1506 impacting negatively on back on track. in fact, the conversations in our office are today around how do we expand the program and back on track
an education -- [applause] >> i guess the question is of fairness. you shouldn't have two systems, one where based on your race or class you can access treatment and move on with your life and another one where because of law enforcement tactics and focus, you end up caught up in a system where you can never move on. you're permanently trapped and weighed down by having a felony conviction. the reason i call it a war on crumbs is the type of people we see at the hall of justice, i brought with me some props. i brought with me a sweetener packet. this is a gram of sweetener. most of the time this is on the high end of the amount of narcotics we see people in possession of. sometimes people have two or three sweetener packages on them and we call them drug dealers, you know. that's why we call it a war on crumbs because the amounts we are talking about are mine us schedule. -- minnesota us schedule. the fact -- are miniscule. and based on less than a packet of sweetener, to me is outrageous. and to me this is a positive first step, in my opinion, because at least you remove some of the stigma
during the darkest periods in our shared history? will the commend the work of the holocaust educational trust? >> i think my honorable friend speaks for the whole house and a developed country and raising his find -- final issue and praising the holocaust education trust. absolutely brilliant organization that make sure young people from schools across our country get the opportunity to go and see the places where the terrible events of the holocaust took place. i had privileges we could meeting with a survivor whose story was truly heroic and truly heartbreaking. but who in her 90s is still making these arguments in making this case so that future generations will and. we should also learn not just about the european holocaust but what has happened recently in rwanda, in bosnia, in cambodia and elsewhere that tragically there is far too much prejudice in our world. >> ed miliband. [shouting] >> mr. speaker, can i join the prime minister in thing to be to kingsman david robert shaw of first battalion the duke of lancaster's regiment. each of the utmost courage and bravery and the condol
is to educate people so that the great depression will never happen again. but it is of its time. the idea that we can teach people certain skills and that they learn these skills, we will all be okay. >> the dark side of the personal-finance industry on "after words" on c-span2. look for more booktv online. like us on facebook. >> british prime minister david cameron says that if the conservative party is returned to power at the next election, there will be a general referendum on britain's future in the european union. he outlined the new relationships in europe. this is a little bit more than 40 minutes. >> i would like to thank limburg for hosting this this morning. this morning i would like to talk about the future of europe. but first let us remember the past. seven years ago, europe was being torn apart by a catastrophic conflict. the skies of london lit by flames night after night. millions dead across the world in the battle for peace and liberty. as we remember the sacrifice, so we should also remember how the shift in europe for more to sustain peace came about. it didn't happe
, education, and agriculture. security is a very minor part, but an important part, but a very minor part. i think that is probably as it should be. the defense strategic guidance that i referred to in my opening comment tells me that in africa, we are to seek a light footprint and innovative approaches and low costs approaches to achieving the united states security objective. we have one base in africa. we have about 2000 people. it supports not only u.s. africa command, but u.s. central command and the transportation command as well. that is our residence on the continent. -- that is our presence on the continent. there are 100 personnel who are supporting africans in the effort to joseph kony and his senior lieutenants to justice. they are indicted by the international criminal court. there is a u.s. log that tells us to do that -- u.s. law that tells us to do that. if there is a law that tells us to do that, we go and do that. and it is important part of the consideration. as i mentioned, i have been to or need to of the different countries. -- i have been to 42 other different countrie
it will get through because you know, one thing i think that we're more educated on than those, we do know that public pension funds, teachers, all of barack obama's, you know, his starting outfield, they have money in the stock market and this will hurt the stock market. >> i hear you, but, guys, i've got to tell you, a lot of things that rich people have done and agreed to in the last few years that i think hurts them and hurts this country. thanks a lot. see this shrimp, i bet you thought he was a goner. and some lawmakers want to bring back the spending that brought back this critter. attention, all shoppers, your credit card bill is about to get bigger with a new fee kicking in this weekend. and people fee'd up are lashing out. lashing out. you maniacs, you blew it up! [ wind howls ] [ dog barks ] ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] something powerful is coming. ♪ see it on february 3rd. ♪ olaf gets great rewards for his small business! pizza! [ garth ] olaf's small busins earns 2% cash back on every purchase, ery day! helium delivery. put it on my spark card! [ pop! ] [ garth ] why settle
of the holocaust educational trust? >> i think my honorable friend speaks for the whole house and indeed the whole country in raising this vital issue, and in pleasing. praising the holocaust educational trust -- an absolutely brilliant charity an organization and makes sure that young people from schools across our country have the opportunity to go and see the places where the terrible event of the holocaust took place. i had an immense privilege of meeting with a holocaust survivor whose store was truly rock and truly heartbreaking, but in her 90s, she is still making these arguments and making this case so future generations will learn. we should also learn, not just about the european holocaust, but what has happened recently in rwanda, bosnia, cambodia. >> can i join the prime minister in paying tribute to kinsman david robert schock of first battalion of the duke of lancaster is regiment? he showed the utmost courage and bravery, and the condolences of the whole house to go to his family and friends. can the prime minister guarantee that if he gets his in a eight- out referendum he will cam
women here are getting education much more than -- sometimes more than boys. the fact that women are falling behind in the workplace that has to mean that their life circumstances are such that they cannot do -- go beyond part-time work so i totally agree with the congresswoman, i think that you have to -- the government, the state has to prepare the ground for these women to achieve the maximum that they can. >> but i think another take on that is that the woman that worked in corporate america for very long time i found women in managerial positions won't hire other women. i find sometimes we're biased on each other in hiring qualified women. >> i don't agree with that. i am running a nonprofit organization -- >> i understand. >> with 500 women in it. i have also worked in america for the past 30 years, i don't think women are women's worst enemies, i think that is -- >> there's some of them. but they're not in the majority. >> i don't think they're the majority, i'm giving a different take on it to add to it the reason why we're not -- i've seen some women with sharp elbows th
tries to buy such as college education, health care, many things that are more costly today than they were 30 years ago. it's very, very difficult. you're almost measuring or comparing apples and oranges. >> are you then conceding all the people say wages have been stagnant for 30 or 40 years that that number is wrong. >> no, no, it's not absolutely wrong. i'm saying that there's a big debate over the deflator, what we're using to measure real incomes and inflation adjusted incomes and the debate centers on whether technologies are accurately included in all of that. >> if you have that number wrong, then the argument falls apart. so instead of having flat wages which by the way doesn't take into account the full compensation someone gets such as fringe benefits but focusing on the wages if that part of the argument is wrong then whole thing is wrong. >> wait, wait, wait. wait, wait, wait that's not all wrong. >> if i could finish my point please. the actual number is between 30% and 40% over that period not flat therefore your argument and the argument of the left and center peo
, that gets transferred into education, and then people make wiser decisions. i think, like you said, i mean how there's access to meth, these dirty, cheap, bad drugs, people were able to get access to much more benign drugs like marijuana, they might make decisions that if they had the education to know that this is actually a healthier choice for you. it's a harm reduction model. we might not ever get rid of drugs completely, but there are safer alternatives to the worse options. >> we have one last question over here in the corner for the evening, and then we're going to have to wrap up this portion and move on to the book signing. so the last question for the evening. >> okay. i wanted to thank you, very, very good presentation. and i think you presented a very good case where the coca leaf is innocuous or even beneficial substance. however, it is true you get cocaine from the coca, and cocaine is quite a, um, well, it's, a substance where you can make a lot of money. and you've got the drug cartels involved in that. how can you control the growth of coca without getting the drug cartels
on a 140 foot sailing ship, the seat association education, i was at sea for three weeks away from telephones, internet and libraries. but i was in the middle of a research project on benjamin franklin that required me to read material in french. i decided to use my time at sea to revise my french by reading a novel in that language. the book i chose is a small paperback edition of jules verne's around the world in 80 days first published as a newspaper serial in 1882. when i wasn't on watch or otherwise busy on the ship by slowly made my way to the book. my french was good enough to my surprise that i enjoyed the story and as a historian i appreciated it. a detail. especially the nature of the sense the protagonist racing around world. at his london club he remarks offhandedly that scheduled travel services could take a person around the globe in a period of the days. proved it, a challenge him and he is off. the att measure was only conceivable by the late nineteenth century. in the age of sail getting around world had taken months or even years. the speed of my sailing ship woul
and greet newcomers from france. the education center organizes the internships year. demand is high right now. what's a lot of the french are retracted by the culture of the cheap cost of living, the possibility that you can do everything. click she has been in berlin for 20 years now. she moved for love and state. even so, she still misses france a lot. it's a common topic when she gets together with her french friend. both mess life and in particular, the lightness of the french way of life. >> i miss the feeling you get when you go shopping in the markets in france in the summertime and how easy it is to make contact with people, how easy it is for people to approach. >> during those first few days, i had to change. you have to communicate a bit more subtle way. for instance, had to say "no" in a more pleasant way. cut stealing home in both. hoping the countries will grow even closer. >> i wish there was even more cooperation, more joint projects, meetings, exchanges. anything and everything helping us to expand. >> of course there will still sometimes be some understanding. odds are a
foundations. dedicated to strengthening america's future through education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. in the neighbourhood ♪ and contributions to your pbs station, ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ would you be mine? ♪ could you be mine? ♪ won't you be my neighbour? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a land of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in this land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street ♪ just waiting to greet you ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighbourhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neighborhood. ♪ - hi, neighbour. we're playing at miss elaina's house today. she lives in the museum-go-round, and she is a very fun friend. verrry fun. - (robot voice): daniel tiger, i'm so glad y
because of my experiences being educated in the west and looking at how western systems did it it was the rule of law. i was surprised by western think tanks and the european ambassadors in our country where they say that is very difficult. you think? i mean, this has been a major challenge and you can't have this by waving a magic wand. it will take hard work so that people start to, for the next elections, vote for candidates because they're on left to right of these particular issues. so, that political party culture, that is the major challenge. and where we're starting from low down in jordan, we're still steps ahead of many countries in the middle east. so, it's going to be tough for all of us. but that's the only way that i think we can do it. >> your majesty, thank you very much. this was a fascinating conversation. >> thank you. >>> that was jordan's king abdullah ii. >>> when we come back, new attacks in algeria have made many talk about the return of al qaeda. but the facts don't quite support the hyperbole. support the hyperbole. i'll explain. [ watch ticking ] [
of the country by disclosing corruption, by debating on public policies, from traffic to housing to education to medical services. and, also, it's great fun and entertainment. you see people very creative, but especially young people. i always enjoy reading their comments, things like that. >> that is fantastic. you're a self-made entrepreneur. so impressive. several television shows. growing media empire. the company that you manage, hence the oprah comparison. >> it's a compliment. i have a lot of admireation for her because of what she has done to empower women. i have a lot of admireation. >> who is your audience? >> i have two shows. "yang lan 101" is a more in-depth show with movers and shakers around the world. i've interviewed more than 600 leaders around the world, including many u.s. presidents and secretaries of state, and my other show "her village" is more like oprah show plus "the view" because i have two other younger women who provide different perspectives on certain issues that women care for. we have celebrities as well as women telling their extraordinary stories. >> are t
will do it in health care, education and energy. think about that. health care is one sixth of the economy. energy, you control the production and the pricing and control everything from he tried to with capt. trade and he tried. education is the future. you control those three elements and you have what lenin would call the commanding height of a post industrial society. that is what he said he wanted to do. in fact, you don't remember this because, unlike me, you have real lives for it you don't have to watch everything the man says. i do for my sins and they clearly are mending. [laughter] but he sprinkled that speech and the subsequent speeches until the georgetown speech with a phrase -- the new foundation, which was never picked up on and never remembered. but it was in there. in fact, the name of the speech was called "the new foundation." he already saw himself one month into the presidency as a successor to the new deal and the new frontier. he wanted this appellation, the new foundation, to be what obama is and would be. so it shows you how ideologically ambitious he was from day
the call to serve throughout his career. his work on issues from education and transportation to civil rights and national service has advanced the causes of our party immeasurably. please join me in thanking our retiring officers. [applause] they have done a remarkable service for the entire country. [applause] >> now, let me introduce our slate of new dnc officers. they are a talented, dedicated and passionate group of people who will strengthen and energize our party. maria elena will serve as vice chair of the dnc. maria's work as executive secretary-treasurer at the los angeles county federation of labor and years of service reaffirm our party's steadfast commitment to american workers. maria will strengthen the already-powerful bond between the dnc and our brothers and sisters in the labor movement. my friend, congresswoman gab earth of hawaii, with your support today will serve as ice varian. a-- vice chair. along with our colleague of illinois is also one of the first female combat veterans to serve in congress. [applause] congresswoman's story is an inspiration and showcases t
at the university of michigan. what it is is a response to, you know, a lot of new education options that are out there online and many of them are free, but, you go and take a course in history at one place, another one on writing and spanish at other places, what do you do with all the classes, especially since a lot of the other universities online they don't offer degrees. under this wisconsin university flexible option program, what students can do is earn a degree by passing a series of tests without ever stepping foot on the campus. now, you may need to take a few classes to get up to speed, but it offers students a ton of flexibility, it could really be a sign of where education is headed. you know, testing your way to a bachelor's degree. >> a lot of people go in their freshman year and say it makes sense. if i could take the test without going to the class. has the university determined how much this program will cost? >> reporter: not yet. but we're going to get more details when this thing goes online in the fall. >> okay. so i want to talk about something serious now. we should proba
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 131 (some duplicates have been removed)